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A Word from Jeff Gallagher, CEO, Virginia Bio It’s my privilege to travel the state and meet hundreds of companies, research institutions, and individuals who are doing fascinating innovative work and making valuable contributions to our economy and to the health and well-being of people around the globe. Every month in this blog I’ll take a short look at an outstanding member of Virginia’s bioscience community, or update you on important information that impacts the community.

 

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Accelerating Progress in Virginia Bioscience Commercialization

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 23, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, September 22, 2015
Members and friends of Virginia Bio,

A sage cautioned “don’t confuse familiarity with understanding.”

Many of us are familiar with the research and commercialization parks and accelerators which are available for biotech commercialization around the state. But don’t blink, and don’t stop asking questions, because the facilities we know are evolving, and new resources are developing across the state to meet the great opportunity bioscience commercialization presents for the Commonwealth.

Let’s start with an update on the Prince William County Science Accelerator at Innovation Park. This space, opened in June 2014, offers leading life science and biotechnology companies 9 wet labs to grow their business at an intersection of university research and commercialization. This accelerator is the only public-private, commercially available wet laboratory space in Northern Virginia, located less than an hour away from key government buildings such as the National Institute of Health and the FDA.

Already, the accelerator is moving fast. ISOThrive LLC, a leader in nutritional ingredients that benefit the gut microbiome, expanded into larger lab space within the accelerator this past April. Since then, it has partnered with George Mason University’s MicroBiome Analysis Center to push along their research into the commercialization process. In addition to ISOThrive, two other companies, Ceres Nanosciences and Virongy, make use of the county’s accelerator. Ceres endeavors to seize the future of diagnostics by researching and commercializing novel sample processing techniques. Virongy, a virological reagent and tool company, provides cutting-edge services that catalyze scientific discoveries, enhance disease treatments, and more.

In Richmond, the Virginia Biotechnology Research Park, to strengthen its role in leading bioscience commercial innovation, has transitioned the Virginia Biotechnology Research Park Corporation Board to The Innovation Council. With an emphasis on innovation and entrepreneurship, the Council, a 501-c(3) entity with 19 members, will seek to leverage individuals and organizations doing groundbreaking work in order to ensure commercial success and benefit the state economy at large. The Council boasts leaders in business, education, and other fields as part of their membership, and also received a helping hand from Dr. Rao, President of Virginia Commonwealth University in the form of a $1.2 million dollar commitment to be matched with other sources of funding.

In Danville, the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research recently completed a strategic reevaluation, and a focus on translational research and support of entrepreneurs and commercialization rose to the top. Its top notch research facilities, leaseholds and common facilities are a great home for the right bio business. IALR’s mix of labs, office and meeting facilities was a perfect spot to host the highly successful statewide Governor’s Forum on Agriculture and Industrial Bio earlier this month.

In Virginia Beach, an impressive year long, community wide economic development planning process, led by the city’s Mayor and top corporate leaders, has recommended an emphasis on biomedical industry development, and designated a 150+ acre tract adjacent to LifeNet Health and Sentara Princess Anne to set aside as biomedical research and commercialization park. Early steps in the plan call for the development thereof a bioscience accelerator.

Back to Northern Virginia, the plans for Inova’s Center for Personalized Health on the massive campus formerly the home to ExxonMobil continue to take shape. The public announcements and interviews are exciting, and it’s clear that an integral element of the campus will be facilities and services to house and support biomedical and biotech startups.

Another new, and very different, player on the scene is the new LiftOff Health, in Arlington, that is accelerating commercial expansion and networking by functioning as a digital platform of collaboration/incubation, with dreams of serving and attracting any entrepreneur around the world. This approach appears at first glance to fit companies in mobile health and e-health - involved in the “creative destruction of medicine”, as Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute, puts the impact of wireless and Internet on medicine and research. Awarables, for example, is a company using LiftOff Health which provides men and women who suffer from chronic sleep disorders an app that tracks details about their sleep patterns.

Check out other parks and accelerators you may be familiar with across the state, and equip yourself with up to date information: Virginia Tech’s impressive Corporate Research Center “CRC” in Blacksburg, UVA Research Park in Charlottesville, Innovation Research Park at ODU, and Innovation Village @ Rockingham by SRI Shenandoah Valley among others. In fact, click here to view our VA Life Sciences Map. On the top row of the map window, choose the Snapshots button, then select Research Park or Accelerator Organization Types to view all together.

We are picking up the pace and getting smarter about creating on the “Virginia Common” the physical and expert resources needed by researchers and entrepreneurs to succeed in commercializing bioscience innovations. The accelerators, incubators and parks are diversifying and providing more value, helping to propel the biotechnology industry into the future, which is looking bright. That means more jobs, more cures and more health for the commonwealth.

Best Regards,



Jeff Gallagher
CEO

Tags:  accelerator  Ceres  commercialization  Economic Development  IALR  Innovation council  Inova  Institute for Advanced Learning and Research  ISOThrive  LifeNet  LiftOff  MicroBiome  prince william  Research  Scripps  Sentara  SRI Shenandoah  Virginia bio  virginia bioscience  virginia biotech  Virongy 

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Ag/Bio - Rapidly Growing High Value Sector

Posted By Administration, Thursday, August 27, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Members and friends of Virginia Bio,

On Wednesday, September 9, we are helping to mount the Governor’s Conference on Agricultural and Industrial Bio, in Danville at the impressive Institute for Advanced Learning and Research.

For the first time ever in Virginia, we’ll gather the companies, researchers and members of the agricultural community working in this rapidly growing high value sector where hi-tech meets Virginia’s largest private industry.

Agricultural and Industrial biotechnology is enabling the world to feed its growing populations and supply fuel and materials to its growing economies in an affordable, sustainable and environmentally sound manner. At the end of this letter, I provide a snapshot of field for those who are unaware.

This rapidly growing sector provides an opportunity to add new hi-tech strength to a pillar of Virginia’s economy. In turn this will strengthen the state’s traditional biomedical biotech industry because of the commonality of skills, talents, resources, supplies, equipment and services required to succeed in R&D and commercialization.
Thanks to generous sponsors, the event is free of charge.

It’s a great agenda on September 9, which will enable attendees to learn in one day, in one place what’s going on in the industry in Virginia, to meet the key players, to better understand the opportunities, to assess public policy and start to think about moving forward.

 

- In a morning and afternoon lightning round, we’ll hear from ten companies, large to small from all across Virginia working across many different areas of ag/ind bio, and we’ll hear from ten researchers from universities and private institutions doing exciting and promising work across the field.

- We’ll hear from Paul Ulanch, Ph.D., MBA, Executive Director, Biotechnology Crop Commercialization Center, with our friends at the North Carolina Biotechnology Center some of the steps they’ve taken in the last five years to become one of the top ag bio centers in the US, and opportunities to collaborate.

- A panel of federal, state and private funders will explore opportunities to fund commercial efforts in this field.

- We’ll hear from Shawn Semones Ph.D., Director of Applied Discovery Research & Development, Salem Virginia Site Lead, Novozymes North America, Inc., one of the world’s leading ag bio companies, on the company’s work, outlook and trends.

- Top state policy makers, including Governor Terry McAuliffe, Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry Todd Haymore, and Delegate Steve Landes will share ideas on the state’s role in supporting the development of the industry.


I look forward to seeing you there! Click here to register now for this important event.


Best Regards,



Jeff Gallagher
CEO

 

Agricultural biotechnology is a rapidly expanding, broad and dynamic industry that applies a range of advanced biotechnology tools, such as genetic engineering, to improve plants and animals, to develop microorganisms for specific agricultural uses, to make agriculture more efficient, sustainable and profitable, and to improve food quality and safety.

Biotechnology can engineer crops to tolerate specific herbicides, making weed control simpler and more efficient, and to be resistant to specific diseases and pests, improving control and decreasing the use of synthetic herbicides and pesticides. Crops with the ability to grow in salty soils or better withstand drought conditions are entering the marketplace. These require less fuel, labor, fertilizer, and water, decreasing pressures on land and wildlife habitats.

Biotechnology creates improved foods, by increasing certain components such as vitamins and other nutrients, and reducing levels of others, such as naturally occurring toxicants, allergens, or saturated fats.

US farmers have rapidly adopted many of these new varieties: 88% of the corn, 94% of the cotton and 93% of the soybeans planted in the U.S. were varieties produced through genetic engineering. Use is spreading globally as well, helping countries keep pace with demand for food while reducing costs.

Genetically engineered bacteria and yeasts produce vitamins and nutritional supplements for human food, and improve the production of fermented beverages and foods.

Biotechnology advances improve animal food, and enable animals to more effectively use nutrients present in feed, and produce new vaccines, diagnostics and treatments for animal disease, and additional markets for animal products.

Biotechnology provides a wealth of tools improving the safety of our food supply chain.

Industrial biotechnology applies biotechnology tools to traditional industrial processes (“bioprocessing”) and the manufacturing of products (such as fuels, chemicals and plastics) from bio-based renewable feedstocks.

New and more valuable sources of biomass, and new more efficient methods of bioprocessing, are being developed continually. Current commercial products include bio-based plastics with applications ranging from cosmetics, home cleaning products and antifreeze to food packaging and car parts, and chemicals used in the production of detergents, textiles, pulp and paper, leather, metals, fuels and minerals.

There is rapid innovation in renewable chemicals, frequently co-produced as side streams of biofuels and bioenergy, providing new intermediates, novel products, or direct replacements for petroleum products.

Genetically engineered crops can serve as factories for the production of a wide array of chemicals, including new medicines.

Tags:  agriculture  funding  government  Governor  IALR  industrial biotechnology  Institute for Advanced Learning and Research  mcauliffe  Novozymes  Paul Ulanch  Shawn Semones  steve landes  Todd Haymore  Virginia bio  virginia bioscience 

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